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In this article, we’ll be showing you seven kinds of fruit that are particularly easy to grow from seeds, either directly in pots or in your garden. With a little effort, you can get your five-a-day and save money too!

Have you ever dreamed about having your own fruit tree?
Almost any fruit you eat at home can be reproduced from its seeds. So, what are you waiting for? 🙂

1. Cherries

Cherry trees are super resilient when it comes to cold weather, so an ideal choice even during the winter months.
To grow your own at home, simply follow these steps:
1. Wash the seeds, known as stones, and make sure you remove all the pulp.
2. To speed up the germination process, gently rub your cherry stones on a rough surface.
3. Place all the stones on some damp kitchen roll in a plastic container and put the container in the refrigerator.
4. Once you see that they are germinating, plant them in the garden.

After that, you’ll need a bit of patience: cherry trees can take up to five years to bear fruit, but it’s well worth the wait!

grow cherry trees from seeds

2. Lemons

You can grow your own lemon tree directly from the seeds of a lemon. It grows nicely in both pots and the garden.
However, bear in mind that lemon trees are very sensitive to cold. For that reason, we recommend planting your seeds at the onset of warm weather.

lemon trees

3. Mandarin oranges

As with lemons, you can also plant mandarin oranges or tangerines from their seeds in either pots or in the garden.

mandarin oranges grown from seeds

4. Apples

Once you have removed the seeds from the apple, you get them to sprout.
To do this, you’ll need to wrap them in some damp kitchen roll, place them in a closed bag and leave them in the refrigerator.
Once they’ve sprouted, they’re ready to plant!

grow loquats from seeds

5. Loquat

Once the seeds have germinated, you can easily transplant them.

This tree for this citrus-like fruit grows in all types of soil and requires little care.
To grow from seeds and plant them:
1. Clean the loquat seeds making sure to remove all the pulp.
2. Put some kitchen roll in a container, place the seeds on top and then add some damp kitchen roll over them.
3. Close the container and wait for a few weeks. Once the seeds have sprouted, it’s time to plant them.

coltivare a partire dai semi

6. Pears

The first step towards having your very own pear tree is to germinate the seeds by placing them in a glass with cotton wool and water.
When you see that they are growing, you should transfer them to a pot.
After a while, your pear tree will get bigger, showing you that it’s time to move it into the garden.

pears

7. Avocados

To grow an avocado tree, you must first remove the stone from the fruit and wash it.
Next, insert three or four toothpicks into the centre of the stone and carefully place it in a glass of water, as shown in the photo. After a few weeks, you will see a root begin to sprout from the bottom. Once the root has reached a length of 10 cm, you must remove the stone from the glass, take out the toothpicks and plant it in a pot.
Smashed avocado anyone?

grow an avocado tree

Did you already know these fruit trees could be grown from seeds at home?

Here are some ideas of where to plant your results and for those of us with no garden, here is a even a list of what plants can you grow from waste food!

Need to find tools for your planting projects? Visit our ManoMano site for all your gardening & home improvement needs.

Is all you’ve avo wanted a beautiful and healthy avocado tree? Avocados are hugely popular for their high source of nutrients and the fact that they are a low carb plant friendly food. Plus, be-leaf it or not, they are super easy to grow with a bit of patience, love and care.

To grow your avocado plant you will need:

1 avocado

1 plastic cup

Water

3 toothpicks

For potting:

1 medium sized pot

Soil – enough to fill your pot of choice

Water

  1. Take your avocado and cut in in half to access the seed.
  2. Wash off any excess flesh for a super shiny seed.
  3. We don’t want to be the devils avocado but, one of the best way to ensure spouting is to peel off the seed’s outer skin to reveal the lighter layer underneath. This means that when the new stem is prepared to form the seed can crack when it’s ready.
  4. Making sure the seed is facing upwards, (the top is the more rounded and pointed side) stick in your 3 toothpicks about ¾ of the way up the seed at an upward angle.
  5. You should then be able to rest your avocado seed in the plastic cup.
  6. Fill your cup until it’s just over halfway up the seed and set it up on a window with lots of sunlight. Change the water every 5 days or so to prevent any fungus or bacteria growth.
  7. You should be seeing a sprout in around 4 to 8 weeks.

Potting method

  1. When your seed has begun to grow a stem and has reached at least 6 inches tall it is then ready to pot.
  2. In order not to damage the root system, make sure that your chosen pot is deep enough to hold your plant and its roots without separating them. Plan out where they will be placed before adding soil.
  3. Add a base layer of soil and then position your plant. Hold it steadily whilst filling in the rest of your soil until level with the toothpicks.
  4. Slowly pull out your toothpicks. If they are too stiff to remove you can also cut them at the base, it may sound pit-ifully wrong but it’s ok!
  5. Give it a light water with room temperature water, making sure not to over do it and just moisten the soil.
  6. Remember to water it regularly as it and give it a weekly feed of fertiliser, as well as keeping an eye on your plant to make sure it’s tall and healthy.

Your tree should start to produce fruit in a few years depending on the type of avocado you’ve used. Avo great time planting!

 

Top Nine Low Maintenance Flowers

Top 5 Useful Indoor House Plants

 

At ManoMano, we admire those who MAKE. And it’s for that very reason that ManoMano supports makers and their projects by telling their stories in the series The Amazing Making Of. Join our celebration of imagination, creativity, hard work and eccentricity!

After the success of MadCow’s giant water slide in episode one, we present to you episode two!

In this episode we meet Gavin who shows us his crazy project on how he uses nature to grow furniture. In his 6 acres of field, Gavin grows chairs, lamps, tables… and maybe even one day, houses!

Find out how he does it:

 

The Amazing Making Of – Giant Water Slide

The Amazing Making Of – THE WINNERS

 

Did you know that indoor house plants have many health benefits, as well as having the ability to brighten up a room? They increase oxygen levels throughout the day, remove pollutants, and apparently can even increase memory retention by 20%, making them perfect for studying or working at your desk! If you’re lost about where to get started, check out our top 10 indoor house plants below for inspiration. Let us know if we missed your favourite one out – we’d love to hear about it!

Top 5 Indoor House Plants

5 – Peace Lily

Indoor House Plants the handy mano mano peace lily

Despite their beauty, these plants are very easy to take care of which is why they are popular office and home plants. All they ask for is medium to low light, and not to be over watered. Check the top of the soil weekly and water when dry. Remember that they are more tolerant of under watering than over watering so don’t make a watering schedule for them.

🌿This plant is the top of NASA’s list for cleaning the air! It removes removes formaldehyde, benzene and trichloroethylene (ie bad things) whilst looking beautiful, too! 🌿

4 – Aloe Vera

Indoor House Plants the handy mano mano aloe vera

Of course, we had to include Aloe vera! This plant carries endless health benefits and doesn’t demand too much form you, either. Make sure that you plant it in a wide container with a potting mixture similar to one which you would use for succulents. The most common cause of death for these plants is a lack of drainage, so water every 3 weeks and avoid keeping the soil soggy constantly. Place it in bright but indirect light, such as behind a curtain in an office.

🌿Squeeze the jelly-like substance out of the leaves and use it to treat sunburn, burns, bruises, acne, psoriasis and many other things, but make sure to never take it internally!🌿

3 – Chinese Evergreen

Indoor House Plants the handy mano mano chinese evergreen

Known to be a very durable houseplant, the Chinese Evergreen plant is both simple to look after and lovely to look at! Make sure you keep it away from any drafts (if anything, it prefers humid conditions) and water it moderately, allowing it to dry out between each time. You’ll notice that the leaves can gather a lot of dust, use a soft damp rag to wipe this away and leave it to air dry.

🌿They are well known for filtering out air pollutants  and getting rid of more and more toxins as time and exposure continues🌿

2 – Spider Plant

Indoor House Plants the handy mano mano spider plant

 

This lovely houseplant is perfect for newbies! You can hang them in baskets, put them on shelves, or leave them on tables to show off their long leaves. Water it once a week, and keep the soil slightly moist during hot months. Fortunately, this plant only needs moderate light to survive, and this doesn’t even need to be natural light, so you can brighten up and dark workspace with them.

🌿These plants are non-toxic so are safe for pets and children to accidentally eat! They also absorb carbon monoxide, formaldehyde and xylene whilst producing oxygen, so it’s a win win!🌿

1 – Rubber Tree

Indoor House Plants the handy mano mano rubber tree

This lovely leafy houseplant needs time to dry out between watering, so make sure to keep it mildly hydrated with a spritz of water on the leaves every now and again. Place it in indirect light to keep it extra happy!

🌿Rubber trees are best known for their large leaves which absorb airborne chemicals and break them down, whilst converting carbon dioxide into breathable oxygen for you! 🌿

Do you think you’ll be investing in one of these indoor house plants? Or do you already have one?

If you need more plant inspiration, try out these other articles:

Top 8 Weird Flowers

Top Nine Low Maintenance Flowers

Nobody likes to discover that their plants are infested with aphids, or that fungi has bloomed. That’s why here at The Handy Mano, we’ve put together some tips to help you prevent plant pests and keep your plants strong, beautiful and healthy.

How to Prevent Plant Pests

1. Fertilise your plants!

Did you know that insects have a preference for weaker plants? That’s why our first piece of advice is to fertilise them regularly. A healthy plant is less attractive to plant pests which means that it’ll bloom better for us! You can use a generic fertiliser for flowering or leafy plants. There are specific fertilisers for veggie patches, orchids, cacti and even a specific one for bonsais. It’s important to follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use, because excessive fertiliser can also do more harm than good!

Aphids and red spiders (pictured) prefer plants that are rich in nitrogen, meaning that any excess of this nutrient can turn your plants into something extra delicious for them, so make sure to always read the label and follow the instructions!

thehandymano mano plant pests how to prevent them leaf with red spiders

2. Check your plants regularly

Check both sides of the leaves, and keep an eye out for discolouration, small holes or webs. It’s easy to realise that you have a whitefly infestation even if you just brush past your plant, so make sure you keep checking up on them!

In doing this, over time you will be able to identify potential problems quicker and therefore be able to give your plant the correct treatment sooner. Many plant pests are cyclical, and repeat year after year, so don’t let them stress you out too much. Try to stay positive, because experience counts and if the pests come back next year, you’ll know exactly what to do.

3. Not all bugs are bad!

It can be an interesting exercise to identify the different insects swarming around our gardens, because they don’t all munch through our plants. Some prey on the plant pests that do eat them, and in such cases, these bugs are the ones we should be concerned about inviting to visit our gardens or plant beds.

That’s what plant biodiversity is all about. For example, a balcony which has only one type of plant growing there may awsell have a neon light to attract its preferred plant pests! Those of us with urban gardens know this all too well, hence we never forget to pair up certain plants with our food crops.
For example, Basil repels mosquitoes and white flies, and Nasturtium repels snails and ants (and it looks great, too!)

4. Apply preventative treatments

You can choose to treat your plants when they already have a problem, or you can apply specific products to prevent the problems from occurring in the first place. If you have geraniums and know that they struggle every year because of the butterflies that lay their eggs on them… why not try to prevent it from happening by using an insecticide?

thehandymano mano plant pests how to prevent them plant bacteria

5. Strictly follow application guidelines

When the doctor prescribes us antibiotics, he always recommends finishing the course of medication even if we feel better, right? Well, it’s the same with plants. Many insecticides work on the adult insects that swarm around the plants but they don’t kill the eggs which can hatch within 15 days.
Repeat the treatment if the instructions recommend you to do so.

6. Beware of over-watering

Most fungi appear because of excess water. This can be caused by either watering too much, or, because of the British weather!
Regardless, it doesn’t hurt to try to prevent fungi growth by using a preventative fungicide. Although we can’t stop the rain, we can at least help our plants a little and get rid of the excess fungi.

7. Dry leaves don’t always mean disease!

If you’re a newbie to gardening, don’t get too worried if you discover some yellow leaves. This doesn’t necessarily mean that your plant isn’t receiving enough nutrients.
During any plant’s growth period, it’s perfectly normal for it to shed some leaves
In such cases, look at the leaf’s position on the plant. Is it one of the biggest and oldest? If yes, relax: it has simply come to the end of its life cycle.
However, it’s okay to worry when the leaf in question is a new leaf or one of the smaller ones, as that means that it was likely to have been born with a deformity or a strange colour. You can find out the likely root of the problem by searching for the plant online and trying to identify the specific symptoms to figure out the next steps to take.
In potted plants, you might notice the leaves lack that ‘luscious green’ look. This is a common issue, and as the leaves are telling us they lack certain nutrients, it’s just up to us to invest in more nutrients and feed them!

Which plant pests worry you the most and how do you keep them at bay? Let us know!

Hungry for more gardening articles? Try out these for more tips:

Types of Shrubs – Seasonal Guide

Lawn Mowing Tips and Tricks